Valmynd Leit

Festival Program

Not to be missed!
A unique and special opportunity
4 venues, 4 nights and over 40 acts.


Tradition for Tomorrow will be a feast of the finest folk and roots music artists from all the Nordik countries from Finland to Iceland and Northern Norway to Southern Denmark as well as some from the British Isles. 

A festival line-up like this has never before been assembled in one place, at the same time in Iceland or anywhere else on the planet.

Below is a day by day, venue by venue list of all the artists with biographies and links to You Tube clips etc.

Please note that all venues have limited seating capacity, so get there in good time to avoid disappointment. The Tradition for Tomorrow organisers reserve the right to make adjustments to the programme.

     

Wednesday - Gala Opening Concert in Hof Cultural Center

Time: 20:30 - 22:30 (Pre-concert show starts at 19:45) 

Illugi Gunnarsson, Minister of Education, Science and Culture, will open the festival


Vefarinn
 (is)

this group from Akureyri in northern Iceland was established in 2004 to research and maintain knowledge about Icelandic dance traditions and the national costume. They are actively keeping the tradition alive and aim to promote public interest in Icelandic folk dancing by teaching and performing.

Sláiđ Ring (fo)

Sláiđ Ring shows that Faroese traditional dance is still very much alive, and a special part of Faroese cultural heritage.

Linda Gytri (no)

Linda Gytri will be playing a lur bound together by birch strips, made by Magnar Storbekken. Playing the lur came naturally to Linda due to the combination of playing the trumpet and growing up at a goat farm in the small village Oldedalen, where she has used the lur to call the goats back home. Linda is improvising over old melodies originally used for getting the animals to come home, using the natural scale of the lur and pure intuition in every tone.

Moberg & Lie (sv/no)

Pär Moberg from Sweden (saxophone) and Jo Asgeir Lie from Norway (accordion), both members of several other groups, play a mix of traditional and their own tunes.

The Danes are Coming! (dk)

This group has been specially created for the Tradition for Tomorrow Festival. All four musicians, fiddle players Poul Bjerager Christiansen, Henrik Jansberg and Kristine Heebřll and accordionist Peter Eget Hansen, play key roles in various Danish folk bands and folk music organisations.

Torgeir Vassvik (sápmi/no)

Powerful vocalist who combines joik and the characteristic Sami frame drum from his native northern Norway with Siberian overtone or throat singing.

Steindór Andersen & Ţór sigurđsson (is)

Celebrated Icelandic rímur-chanter (kvćđamađur) Steindór joins with his college and friend Ţór. These two amazing kvćđamenn give you a taste of the best that the rímur-chanting tradition has to offer. This will be an event not to be missed.

Suunta (fi)

Three musician-explorers of world music from Finland. Anna-Kaisa Liedes: vocals and kantele, Timo Väänänen: kanteles, (live electronics) and Kristiina Ilmonen: ethnic wind instruments, percussion and voice. 

Rauno Nieminen (fi)

Finnish multi-instrumentalist, instrument builder and a researcher. His main instruments are jouhikko (bowed lyre) and kantele. Rauno has played a key part in the resurgence of jouhikko.

Greenland's Drum Dance (gr)

With help from Kaluk, friendship-association of Iceland and Greenland, the drum dancers Anda T. Kuitse and Putso Kuitse from Greenland will perform their incredible drum dance tradition at Tradition for Tomorrow.

Glima & Ulf-Arne Johannessen (no)

The string trio Glima from Norway play hardanger fiddle (the Norwegian folk fiddle with sympathetic strings), viola and cello. Ulf-Arne Johannessen is a champion dancer from Ĺl in Hallingdal, the area in Norway that gave its name to the famous Halling dance.

Spćlimenninir í Nólsoy (fo)

(Accordion, fiddle, piano and bass) come from the small town of Nólsoy in the Faroe Islands. They play mostly Scottish and Nordic folk music, but also their own compositions firmly rooted in Nordic traditions.

Ilona Korhonen (fi)

Ilona from Finland is involved in all kinds of music, mostly vocal. Her main focus as a solo singer is on runo-singing, the ancient Finnish form of epic ballad singing.

Kristín og Anna (is)

Originally from Ađaldalur in northern Iceland, the sisters Anna Sigtryggsdóttir og Kristín Sigtryggsdóttir, come from a long line of poets and singers in the old Icelandic rímur and kvćđalag epic ballad singing style. Anna Sigtryggsdóttir is the chairman of Gefjun kvćđamannafélag.

Unni Lřvlid (no)

- the voice of the west-coast of Norway. Unni has an exceptional voice and an original way of re-creating the music of her cultural heritage into new artistic forms. “Lřvlid’s voice is pure and direct, completely at ease with all the changing moods.” Fiona Talkington, BBC

Music from Västanĺ Teater (sv)

- from Sweden has developed a unique style where music, dance and acting equally share the responsibility in telling the story.  Multi-instrumentalists at Tradition for Tomorrow will be Jonas Brandin - violins, hurdy gurdy & flutes; Klas-Anders Haglund - violins, nyckelharpas, mandola & mandolin; Oskar Reuter - guitar, mandola & mandolin and Niklas Bertilsson - percussion and organ.

Kjuregej Spćlimenninir í Nólsoy
     

Thursday evening

Time: 20:00 - 23:00 

Grćni hatturinn, Hafnarstrćti 96 


Gillebríde MacMillan
(sc)

- is a Gaelic singer from South Uist in the Western Isles of Scotland. Gaelic is his mother tongue and Gaelic songs and traditions have always been an important part of family life. 


Kjuregej (is)

Alexandra Argunova is a singer from Yakutia in the heart of Siberia. She has been living in Iceland for almost half a century and will be accompanied by Icelandic musicians Ásgeir Ásgeirsson guitar and ’roots rocker’ Halldór Warén.

Unni Lřvlid (no)

-  the voice of the west-coast of Norway. Unni has an exceptional voice and an original way of re-creating the music of her cultural heritage into new artistic forms. “Lřvlid’s voice is pure and direct, completely at ease with all the changing moods.” Fiona Talkington, BBC.

Moberg & Lie (sv)

Pär Moberg from Sweden (saxophone) and Jo Asgeir Lie from Norway (accordion), both members of several other groups, play a mix of traditional and their own tunes.



Sjallinn, Geislagötu 14 


REK: Anna & Mathilde
 (no)

Anna Gjendem and Mathilde Řverland are dancers from north western Norway. They will dance to energetic live music played Hilde Fjerdingřy on diatonic button accordion and fiddler Jo Einar Jansen.

Glima (no)

The string trio Glima from Norway play hardanger fiddle (the Norwegian folk fiddle with sympathetic strings), viola and cello. They perform material ranging from religious folk melodies and sensitive arrangements of other vocal material, to their own arrangements of exciting dance tunes.

Ulf-Arne Johannessen (no)

- is a champion dancer who performs the famous Halling dance from his home area, Ĺl in Hallingdal, in Norway.

Spćlimenninir í Nólsoy (fo)

– (Accordion, fiddle, piano and bass) come from the small town of Nólsoy in the Faroe Islands. They play mostly Scottish and Nordic folk music, but also their own compositions firmly rooted in Nordic traditions.

Suunta Ragga Gröndal & the Icelandic Folk Ensemble
     

Friday evening

Time: 19:30 - midnight 

Grćni hatturinn, Hafnarstrćti 96
 

Susanne Rosenberg (sv)

- is one of Sweden’s foremost folk singers today. She will perform her acclaimed suite of songs ‘ReBoot/OmStart’, which includes Swedish traditional folk songs, such as ballads, kulning and rhymes along with newly written songs in a continuous sequence without introductions or breaks.

Greenland's Drum Dance (gr)

From the very westernmost edge of the Nordik region, or the eastern edge of North American indigenous cultures, with the help of Kaluk, the friendship association of Iceland and Greenland, we are delighted to welcome Putse Kuitse and Anda T. Kuitse from Kulusuk, with their unique drum dance. Members of Putse’s family are the most famous drum dancers in Greenland. Anda is also well known in eastern Greenland as a member of the band Appismaar who have played twice before in Iceland.

Gefjun & Ríma (is)

– from Akureyri and Siglufjörđur in north of Iceland are two societies for kvćđamenn, the performers of kvćđalög, the tunes accompanying the traditional Icelandic narrative epic poetry (rímur) as well as shorter poems composed in one of the 450 rímur-meters. They will also perform quintsongs (tvísöngvar) the most curious of Icelandic vocal traditions.

Suunta (fi)

Three musician-explorers of world music from Finland. Anna-Kaisa Liedes: vocals and kantele; Timo Väänänen: kanteles &live electronics and Kristiina Ilmonen: ethnic wind instruments, percussion and voice. 

The Danes are Coming! (dk) 

This group has been specially created for the Tradition for Tomorrow Festival. All four musicians, Poul Bjerager Christiansen, Henrik Jansberg and Kristine Heebřll –fiddle and Peter Eget Hansen – accordion, play key roles in various Danish folk bands and folk music organisations.



Kaffi Akureyri, Strandgötu 7


Funi
(is)

Bára Grímsdóttir (vocals, kantele & langspil) and Chris Foster (vocals, langspil, guitar and Icelandic fiđla) perform the traditional songs of Iceland and England. "Each singer is a great presenter of the music of a native island, but as a duo with great skill and musicality, they transform the music of their islands into universals." Concert Review, Folk Society of Greater Washington, USA.

Gro Marie Svidal (no)

- is one of Norway's most popular and talented Hardanger fiddlers. Her interpretation of traditional music from western Norway takes audiences on a musical journey through the country's fjords and other dramatic landscapes. Her enthusiasm and stage presence win the audience over every time.

Linda Gytri (no)

Rising star of the piano accordion from Norway plays old traditional tunes and her own compositions. "The sounds of her music would generate a melodic response anywhere in the world." Vandana Shukla, The Tribute, India

Duo Jansen/Jüssi (no/sv)

From Norway and Estonia, Jo Einar Jansen and Johanna-Adele Jüssi play traditional fiddle tunes from Norway and Estonia, diving into the world of older dance music, exploring the line between the beautiful and the rough. Dance groove and playfullness go hand in hand. 

Juuri & Juuri (fi)

The Finnish duo Emilia Lajunen (5-string fiddle, nyckelharpa & vocals) and Eero Grundström (harmonium, harmonica & vocals), formed Juuri & Juuri (Root & Root) in 2003 to counterbalance the usual pop-ified folk with innovative use of archaic melodies and the power of the roots. 



Hamrar in Hof Cultural Center.
 

Ţórarinn Stefánsson (is)

– is a pianist from Akureyri. His concert at Tradition for Tomorrow marks the release of his first solo CD, Ísland / Iceland, which is a collection of compositions based on Icelandic folk songs, among them his own suite of 14 different arrangements of the Icelandic quint-song Ísland, farsćlda frón. 

Björg, Elísabet & Hilmar (is)

Soprano, Björg Ţórhallsdóttir and harpist, Elísabet Waage started performing together in 2006. In 2008 they represented Iceland at the NICE Nordic music festival in England. Since 2011, the duo has grown into a trio with the addition of organist Hilmar Örn Agnarsson. 

Ragga Gröndal & The Icelandic Folk Ensemble (is)

– Popular Icelandic singer  Ragnheiđur (a.k.a. Ragga) Gröndal has been exploring Icelandic folk music since 2003. She put together The Icelandic Folk Ensemble with her brother Haukur on clarinet and renowned guitarist Guđmundur Pétursson releasing the album Tregagás in 2009.

Ilona Korhonen Arja Kastinen BLM
     

Saturday afternoon

Time: 16:00  

Sjallinn, Geislagötu 14 


16:00
The little Prince (no)

A play in Norwegian for all the family performed by Gro Marie Svidal: Hardanger fiddle, Ulf-Arne Johannessen: one-row melodion, mouth-organ & dance and Tom Karlsrud: accordion. This performance combines elements of Norwegian traditional folk dances and folk music with theatre. Each character has his or her personal music and movements. 

17:30
Greenland's Drum Dance (gr)

From the very westernmost edge of the Nordik region, or the eastern edge of North American indigenous cultures, with the help of Kaluk, the friendship association of Iceland and Greenland, we are delighted to welcome Putse Kuitse and Anda T. Kuitse from Kulusuk, with their unique drum dance. Members of Putse’s family are the most famous drum dancers in Greenland. Anda is also well known in eastern Greenland as a member of the band Appismaar who have played twice before in Iceland.


 

Saturday evening

Time: 20:00 - 02:00

Grćni hatturinn, Hafnarstrćti 96


Steindór Andersen & Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson
 (is)

Iceland’s most celebrated kvćđamađur, Steindór blends the ancient kveđa singing style of the old, epic rímur ballads with the subtle, contemporary electronic and acoustic accompaniments of long time collaborator, the composer Hilmar Örn.

Ontrei (fi)

The music of Timo Väänänen and Rauno Nieminen as the duo Ontrei is rooted in Finnish traditions and flavored by improvisation and various musical styles. Their music will take you on an unexpected journey.

Rim (no/sv)

- is a collaboration between three young musicians from the northern parts of Scandinavia. Hilde Fjerdingřy on diatonic button accordion and fiddler Jo Einar Jansen come from Norway and Elin Jonsson from Sweden plays violin and viola. They play dance music from the borderlands of Sweden and Norway with a groovy and delicate sound.

Global Fever Orchestra (sápmi/no)

- from Norway, combine traditional music, a contemporary sensibility and new technology. Vocalist, Torgeir Vassvik, mixes traditional Sami joik, with Siberian overtone singing and also plays acoustic guitar, frame drum and jaws harp, Jan Lothe Eriksen plays cello. They are joined by live sound engineer Audun Strype.

Torrek (is/ir)

Atli Örvarsson, Keyboards, Accordion & Computer and vocalist Hilda Örvarsdóttir, from Iceland join forces with Irish musicians Eogan Neff, fiddle & chincello and Flaithri Neff on Uilleann Pipes, Low-Whistles & vPipes fusing Irish and Icelandic folk elements under the umbrella of cinematic electronica. 


 

Kaffi Akureyri,  Strandgötu 7


Arja Kastinen
 (fi)

– is a virtuoso kantele player from Finland who has performed widely throughout Europe and further afield. She has received many grants for performing, recording, teaching and researching the Finnish kantele. She can be heard on 13 CDs, four of which are her solo recordings. 

When I Listen To Bingsjö (sv)

Fiddle player Bridget Marsden's first encounter with Swedish folk music made such a strong impression that she moved from England to Sweden. For Bridget, Bingsjö is a music tradition that has come about through meetings between different musicians. She is joined here by Swedish fiddle player Jon Holmén.

Sigurđur Sigurđarson (is)

Sigurđur is an amazing rímur chanter who comes to us from the south of Iceland. He will perform Höfuđlausn (Head's Ransom), the skaldic poem attributed to Egill Skallagrímsson in praise of king Eirik Bloddaxe.  Sigurđur will also perform Tvísöngvar (quintsongs) with his wife Ólöf.

Thomas & Lisa (sv)

– from Sweden, fiddler Thomas von Wachtenfeldt and accordionist Lisa Eriksson Lĺngbacka  performed their first concert together at Gränsfors Spelmansstämma in 2012. Their repertoire consists mainly of tunes from Hälsingland and Ostrobothnia.

Ilona Korhonen (fi)

From Finland is involved in all kinds of music, mostly vocal. Her main focus as a solo singer is on runo-singing, the ancient Finnish form of epic ballad singing.

BLM (sv)

Petter Berndalen, percussion,  Olle Lindvall, guitar and Olof Misgeld, fiddle, play music that moves between improvisation and traditional Swedish folk music. With extremely strong song material, BLM brings a new voice to the modern Swedish folk music.


 

Sjallinn, Geislagötu 14 


Dancers from VäkeväKollektive 
(fi)

The dancers Tuomas & Outi – are members of VäkeväKollektive – a company established in 2012 to work as a contemporary art platform for young dancers, musicians and stage designers. The collective members share a common interest in Finnish folklore. Their aim is to approach and promote tradition by using the performing arts in the field of folklore and folk art.

Music from Västanĺ Teater (sv)

Västanĺ Teater from Sweden has developed a unique style where music, dance and acting equally share the responsibility in telling the story.  Multi-instrumentalists at Tradition for Tomorrow will be Jonas Brandin - violins, hurdy gurdy & flutes; Klas-Anders Haglund - violins, nyckelharpas, mandola & mandolin; Oskar Reuter - guitar, mandola & mandolin and Niklas Bertilsson - percussion and organ.

Nordic Barn Dance (Grand Nordic Dance Ball)

This social dance will be led by the Icelandic dance group Vefarinn and Icelandic accordion players, as well as musicians and dancers from all the guest countries. So come along, put on your dancing shoes and dance your socks off.

Nordic Culture Point Nordic Council of MinistersArt Council NorwaySwedish Arts Council 

  Menningarráđ Eyţings   Air Iceland


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Akureyri

20. - 23. ágúst 2014

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